Buy Safe Media
Wednesday, July 27th by Ekaterina
The American Advertising Federation (AAF) has become the most recent Supporter of BuySafeMedia, an industry-wide initiative to heighten the awareness of utilizing independently audited media. The AAF, the oldest national advertising trade association, represents 40,000 professionals in the U.S. advertising industry. The AAF protects and promotes the well-being of advertising through a nationally coordinated grassroots network of advertisers, agencies, media companies, local advertising clubs and college chapters. "Advertising works best, for marketers and consumers, when the right information gets to the right people,” explained Clark Rector, AAF’s Executive Vice President-Government Affairs. “BuySafeMedia is an invaluable tool for advertisers and media buyers to assure that the metrics of their media buy matches the metrics of their expectations. The AAF is pleased to be a supporter of BuySafeMedia and its important work on behalf of the advertising industry."
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Monday, June 27th by Ekaterina
Is your event's registration process proving the quality of your attendees? If not, it should be. Read more...

External link: Value of Event Audits

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Friday, May 20th by Ekaterina
American Business Media (ABM) reports that total revenue for b-to-b media stayed flat from 2009 to 2010. However, declines in tradeshow and print revenue were partially offset by aggressive growth in digital. The 2010 Business Information Network (BIN) report shows that tradeshow revenue fell 6.4 percent to $10.2 billion in 2010. Print also dropped, down 1.3 percent to $7.4 billion. Tradeshow revenue accounted for 42.9 percent of overall b-to-b revenue in 2010 (down from 45.6 percent in 2009), while print as an overall percentage fell slightly from 31.4 percent to 31.1 percent. Digital boasted the biggest growth in b-to-b dollars, up 15 percent to $4.6 billion in 2010 and represented 19.3 percent of overall b-to-b revenue in 2010 (up from 16.7 percent in 2009). Data revenue also increased, earning $1.6 billion in 2010, up from $1.5 billion in 2009. Data’s overall share in b-to-b revenue was up, growing from 6.3 percent in 2009 to 6.7 percent in 2010.

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Friday, May 13th by Ekaterina
I'm obsessed with Westerns, and it occurred to me that the progress of social media resembles the settling of the Old West: small pioneer groups blaze trails across the new landscape, sparking the interest of larger groups who arrive later. As the population increases, businesses spring up to serve the growing numbers of settlers and take advantage of new resources. Eventually, the initial lawlessness gives way to increasing demands for law and order, pushed by legitimate businesses and ordinary citizens afraid that outlaws will jeopardize their newfound prosperity (in part by deterring continued immigration). While competition was taken for granted, one of the dominant themes of the Old West was the recognition of the need for communal goods like law enforcement, a system for registering property ownership, and so on. Another of the key elements in the expansion of civilization along the frontier was the availability of a common currency, as primitive systems of barter gave way to more traditional kinds of commerce. Likewise, one of the key elements in the taming of the still-wild (social media scene) will be the introduction of some kind of common currency, or maybe even a couple common currencies, for measuring the impact of social media advertising campaigns. Quite what this will look like, I couldn't say, but it's clear nonetheless that marketing and advertising execs would love to have some concrete, reliable metrics for social media ROI. Ideally these metrics would detail the advantages and shortcomings of various social media platforms. By identifying strengths and weaknesses, the metrics would allow media buyers and planners to find ways to make all their different media options work together. Defining social media ROI will require answering a series of important questions -- and because social media advertising is a dynamic market, these questions will probably be answered on an ad hoc, case-by-case basis, by companies that are actually working in the field and reporting back certain broadly-applicable findings. Of course there will be a certain amount of information about successful campaigns they naturally hold back -- their "secret sauce" -- but there is at least as much reason to pool some of the useful information creative and media planning and buying agencies cull from their big wins. This is the very sensible consensus behind trade organizations like the Interactive Advertising Bureau. In short, there is always plenty of time and space for competition, but in some circumstances it also behooves competitors to cooperate. Measurement is the great equalizer in this regard, as advertising clients now demand not only accountability and comparability within media, but also between media. In the brave new world, social media must eventually stand alongside television, magazine readership, radio listening, other online behaviors, word-of-mouth, outdoor advertising, and the list goes on. Taking a step back, the big picture is one of evolving metrics for all media, changing in tandem with the media themselves. New capabilities in ad delivery are outpacing the means of measurement all across the board, leaving research companies are racing to catch up. But one thing remains certain: in this complicated world, in a truly chaotic state, we require quantitative data (and almost certainly a wide variety of quantitative data) to make sense of what we are doing. Which brings us back to square one: getting competitors to work together, at least to some degree. Following that line of reasoning, I would like to draw your attention to a very good commentary by Reggie Bradford, founder and CEO of Vitrue, published in MediaPost's Marketing Daily newsletter on Wednesday, May 5. Bradford points out that competitive tension can be both constructive and destructive, depending on the attitude of the individuals and companies involved. Obviously, nailing down social metrics calls for the constructive approach. But that doesn't necessarily come easily to fiercely competitive entrepreneurial types; it probably doesn't help that social media, where many of these conversations are (fittingly) taking place, is often distinguished by a certain, how shall I say, bitchy sniping, especially when people can post anonymous comments. Thus Bradford lamented some of the initial reactions to a post by Buddy Media about Facebook social media metrics. While conversation and criticism is the whole point of posting findings online, Bradford noted that some reactions were just mean-spirited attacks that contributed nothing to the actual subject at hand. It's a free country, and of course people can say whatever they want, but I agree with Bradford that it would be unfortunate if this kind of "gotcha" attitude prevented companies from sharing their findings and musings about social media metrics. People will be more willing to go out on a limb if they aren't afraid that some anonymous competitor is going to saw it off. Turning again to the big picture, the process of producing reliable social media metrics will necessarily require the industry to move through a series of less-than-satisfactory precursors, which will ultimately prove transitory -- milestones on the way to a more-or-less finished product. It's silly (and unhelpful) to expect any of the precursors to solve all the problems at once; rather, a complex, long-term discussion of this sort calls for patience, open-mindedness, and civility.

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Friday, April 29th by Ekaterina

The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council has announced a major new thought leadership initiative to examine the extent and effects of a demanding new world of subscriber complexity and choice in today's communications services market.

The new global program will profile and benchmark where and how companies are experiencing and addressing diverse needs, preferences, and behavior patterns across a multiplicity of device types, plans, and pricing options in the complex market for telecommunications, wireless, and digital media services.

External link: The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council

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Friday, March 18th by Ekaterina

“Unleash”, BMA’s 2011 annual international conference, will be taking place on June 1-3 in downtown Chicago.

In all, “Unleash” will feature keynoters, panel moderators and panelists from as many as 50 companies in a wide range of b-to-b verticals.

Early-bird rate starts March 1, ending April 30.

External link: The Business Marketing Institute (BMA)

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